With domestic and foreign technical institutions

  • Nagra cultivates an intensive exchange of information and experience
  • It carries out joint projects (e.g. in rock laboratories)
  • It organises technical meetings and participates actively in working groups of international organisations

Collaboration with leading experts from around the world ensures a high quality of work that is recognised internationally. 

Many years of successful collaboration link Nagra particularly with the Waste Management Laboratory of the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). Participation in the Research Framework Programmes of the European Union (EU) has also become an important component of Nagra’s research and development activities. 

A regular exchange of information between Nagra and foreign partner organisations also takes place as part of various bilateral agreements. Joint projects are also carried out with some partners. These projects are either multilateral (e.g. in rock laboratories) or are carried out together with international organisations, in particular the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and the EU. Besides these formal collaboration activities, a close international network of personal contacts also provides Nagra with numerous opportunities for discussing technical issues. In addition to partner organisations, this network includes the wider scientific community which is integrated into Nagra’s daily work through reviewing of projects.  

Nagra is also represented on various advisory bodies of its sister organisations (e.g. in Belgium, Germany, Finland, France and Canada). In this way, Nagra can benefit directly from experience in other countries.

National and international collaboration

In 2004, Nagra invited research partners and guests from around the world to celebrate 20 years of research at the Grimsel Test Site. Research has been ongoing at the Test Site since 1984. Nagra also works closely with domestic and foreign research partners in the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory.

Image: Nagra